Drone Beat: Robot porn, feds ground high school drone program and more




The new Bebop Parrot drone flies front of a Rome marble statue "August en Triomphateur" during a presentation to the press in Paris, France, on Nov. 7, 2014.

The U.S. government uses them to bomb alleged terrorists in far-away places. Tech companies like Amazon, Google and Facebook are all toying with the idea of using them, and now they're a photographer's secret weapon. Drones are a big part of our lives, whether we see them or not. Drone Beat collects the best and most important stories every week.
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Drone Beat's coverage areas this week

Last update: Nov. 7, 6:56 p.m.

The first drone-shot porn is here

It's called "Drone Boning" (of course!) and it's the first-ever porn video filmed entirely with flying robots.
The video, embedded below, is not exactly a real porn movie, but more of an art project with some politics and activism sprinkled in. Brandon LaGanke, one of the filmmakers behind the video, told Motherboard that the idea for the video was at first "a kind of funny commentary on privacy and voyeurism, but it quickly became a conceptual grounding."
Plus, it's a pretty bad porn movie.
"I would never shoot a real porn like this," LaGanke said. "If you can't masturbate to it, man, it's not a good pornography film."
You can check out the video — obviously NSFW — on Vimeo.

Drone helps save a window cleaner

We've written before about how unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can help in search-and-rescue situations. We now have a new example of their power.
In Abu Dhabi, a window cleaner was trapped outside the 10th floor of a high-rise due to a malfunction of the scaffold he was using. A drone come over and was able to detect the issue and instruct the worker on how to repair it, according to the local Khaleej Tmes.
The New York Post described the flying robot as a "hovering hero."
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High School grounds drone program after feds ask questions about it

If you are a regular Drone Beat reader, at this point you know that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is not the biggest fan of people using drones, and often gets in the way when people want to use them.
Forget about the fact that some believe they don't have the legal authority to do so, the point is, the FAA has grounded more than one drone before. Their latest victim seems to be a high school in North Carolina, which shut down its drone program after the FAA sent a letter asking questions about it.
"They didn’t say we had violated any regulation, but said they had questions,” Colin Fegeley, the Green Hope High athletic director, told local media.
The school's Black Falcons, who describe themselves as a "cybersecurity club," according to WNCN, used a drone to livestream a school's football game on Oct. 3. But after receiving the letter, they decided to stop using it, "due to concerns from the Federal Aviation Administration."
Here's some footage from that game.

China boasts of "100% accurate" anti-drone laser

China has created an anti-drone laser weapon that is, supposedly, 100% accurate, according to state media. The weapon has a 1.2-mile range and can shoot down UAVs in just 5 seconds after locating them, the Guardian reported.
While that particular kind of functionality seems unlikely, anti-drone lasers are not far-fetched. In April of last year, the U.S. Navy unveiled a ship-mounted laser cannon capable of shooting down drones. And a few months later, it was the Army's turn to boast of its own anti-flying robot laser gun.
It seems like a dystopian future in which Star Wars-like weapons take down evil drones is closer than ever.




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